Avoid a Too-Early Harvest

Whether you’re a seasoned grower or new to the game, timing your trim can be a tricky operation to navigate, so we want to provide you with the tools necessary to avoid a too-early harvest.


Trim Daddy couldn’t do its job without you - so we’ll lay out some ground rules.


Patience is Key


According to Big Buds Mag, “if you harvest too early, you miss out on that weight gain, which means missing out on potentially 30-45 percent of your profits.” Because the last trimester of the growing process is so crucial to the quality of your weed, you want to make sure the timing of your harvest sets you up for success.


Harvesting too early can cause you to lose some of the plant’s potency, creating a different and potentially less pleasurable consumption experience.


Waiting just a week can produce significantly better results. Just like the saying “a watched pot never boils,” your plants need the opportunity to fully develop before you decide to pull the plug.


However, there is a gray area between harvesting too early and too late depending on the type of high you’re going for. Keep reading to figure out how you can better calculate potency as your babies grow!


Don’t Sell Yourself Short


We’re with you on wanting the highest quality flower, but that means allowing your plants the life cycle they deserve.


In the final weeks of harvest, the trichomes on your plants should appear milky white. It takes about two weeks for them to transition from cloudy to a darker amber color.


What is a trichome? By definition, they are “fine outgrowths or appendages on plants, algae, lichens and certain protists.”


Trichomes produce cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids - all of which contribute to the flavor profile and strength of your favorite strains.


“Harvesting too early, when all the resin glands are intact, sturdy and clear, provides a...less intense high than harvesting at peak potency when some of the resin glands are cloudy and/or amber.” (BigBudsMag)


A certain THC percentage can be lost if you harvest too soon - so if you’re looking for a heavier high especially, wait just a little bit longer.





It’s All In The Details


When timing your harvest, you gotta have an eye for the little things. A magnifying glass can be helpful in those final days of growth to really nail it.

  • Are your plants covered in a thick layer of trichomes?
  • Are most of the trichomes transitioning from completely clear to milky white?
  • What is the structure of your resin glands? Are they sturdy and vertical?

If you’re growing outdoors, pay attention to weather patterns also.


Determine Your Ideal High

A common harvest myth is that you must follow the breeder’s and/or bloom-phase estimates to a tee. However, by carefully monitoring your plants, you can actually engineer the type of high you want to achieve.


One cannabis plant is not always like the other, so don’t necessarily take another’s word for it.


Another thing to note  - if you’re going for bubble hash, kief or other forms of processed cannabis concentrates rather than flower, BigBudsMag says “harvesting too early robs you of some of your resin gland harvest.”


For a lighter, less serious high, notice when the resin glands are just beginning to turn cloudy and keep a close eye for the next few days.


If you’re looking for a heavier, more concentrated high, wait until approximately 30-35 percent of the glands are cloudy or amber.


Different harvesters have different opinions on which type of high suits their purposes, so do you. But remember - allowing your plants adequate time to mature will benefit everyone involved in the long run.


Once you’ve determined the harvest time that fits your needs, let Trim Daddy do the rest. 


Even if your harvest is impeccably timed, don’t ruin a good thing by resorting to scissor or hand trimming. The right trimming equipment can make or break the end of your harvest, so shop Trim Daddy today! We know you dedicated time and energy into this project, so let us take the uncertainty out of those final harvesting steps.


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